[Photo Gallery]

 

Synopsis

How maritime heritage can contribute in the development of tools and capabilities to plan, design, and sustain competitive future scenarios that focus on the sea and its peculiarities as a main resource? Maritime heritage data are already collected, all around the world. Most harbour cities have public and private bodies (museums, centres, institutes, academic curricula, and/or associations) devoted to maritime heritage as a whole or to one or more of its arenas (sea-lanes network, water cities conservation issues, naval architecture, maritime logistics, underwater archaeology).

In our vision Heritage Science applies interdisciplinary methods to the study and conservation of tangible and intangible cultural heritage not for the sake of the past but to contribute to a sustainable and better future. In a 21st century global perspective, innovation and change in heritage interpretation processes of indigenous traditions require strategic political choices. Indeed, the deep impact that maritime heritage policies have on the future development of local identities is detectable in both local self-awareness and international external perception of the image of port cities and sea states.

As a contribution to understand how heritage can be systematically and scientifically exploited as a resource for present and future sustainable policies, we propose to observe it through the lens of complexity theory. In a nutshell, complexity is an emergent property of a system with a large number of players and strong nonlinear interactions. This complexity is irreducible in the sense that no change of reference frame can make the description of the system simpler. In our case, complex interactions between present and past give rise to regimes (basins of attraction) separated by tipping points in a very high-dimensional cultural landscape. Whether we wish to remain in the same regime or to make a transition to a different regime, we need to measure how close we are to the various tipping points. Complexity theory offers the tools to detect nonlinear and discontinuous regime shifts that are impossible to detect using methods developed for linear and continuous changes. Complexity theory, and in particular complex networks theory further helps us understand the nature of these regime shifts in terms of ‘who’ (key players), ‘what’ (key heritage elements), ‘when’ (key timings), ‘where’ (key locales), ‘why’ (key drivers for the change), ‘how’ (key mechanisms). Once we understand regime shifts, complexity theory then offers suggestions on what data-driven procedures we can adopt to engineer regime shifts, either towards a desired regime, or to stay within a given regime.

 

[Programme]

 

Videos & Presentation Slides

Welcome speech by Vibeke Sorensen
Chair of School of Art, Design and Media, Nanyang Technological University

 

Opening speech by Bertil Andersson
President, Nanyang Technological University

 

1st keynote address

Chair: Andrea Nanetti
Associate Professor, School of Art, Design and Media, Nanyang Technological University
Biography

Speaker: David Abulafia
Professor of Mediterranean History in the University of Cambridge & Papathomas Professorial Fellow of Gonville and Caius College at Cambridge, United Kingdom
Biography & AbstractPresentation

 

Panel 1: Historical Interdependencies among Maritime Cities, in Asia

Chair: David Abulafia

Speaker: Kwa Chong Guan
Honorary Adjunct Associate Professor and Visiting Fellow at the Archaeological Unit of the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore & Senior Fellow, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University
Biography & AbstractPresentation

 

Speaker: John Miksic
Professor, Southeast Asian Studies Department, National University of Singapore
Biography & Abstract │ Presentation

 

Q&A

 

Panel 2a: Rise and Fall of Hubs along the Maritime Silk Routes

Chair: John Miksic

Speaker: Asmahan Al-Garoo
Associate Professor, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman
Biography & AbstractPresentation

 

Speaker: Mei Qing
Professor, College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Department of Architecture, Tongji University, Shanghai & Consultant Expert, WHITRAP-UNESCO Shanghai, China
Biography & Abstract Presentation

 

Speaker: Moain Sadeq
Associate Professor, Department of Humanities, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar
Biography & AbstractPresentation

 

Q&A

 

Panel 2b: Rise and Fall of Hubs along the Maritime Silk Routes

Chair: Kwa Chong Guan

Speaker: Federico De Romanis
Associate Professor, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
Biography & Abstract │ Presentation

 

Speaker: Dhiravat Na Pombejra
Independent Scholar, Former Associate Professor, Department of History, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
Biography & AbstractPresentation

 

Speaker: Donna Brunero
Senior Lecturer, Department of History, National University of Singapore
Biography & AbstractPresentation

 

Q&A

 

2nd keynote address

Chair: Alan Chan
Dean, College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University
Biography

Speaker: Roger Kain
Professor, Dean and Chief Executive, School of Advanced Study, University of London, United Kingdom
Biography & AbstractPresentation

 

Panel 3: Maritime Space

Chair: Roger Kain

Speakers: Andrea Nanetti and Cheong Siew Ann
Conference chairs
Biography & Abstract │ Presentation

 

Speaker: Angelo Cattaneo
Associate Professor, The Portuguese Centre for Global History, New University of Lisbon, Portugal
Biography & AbstractPresentation

 

Speaker: Evelyn Hu-Dehart
Professor, Department of History, Brown University, USA & Visiting Professor, History Program, Nanyang Technological University
Biography & Abstract │ Presentation

 

Q&A

 

Panel 4: Maritime Heritage and the Arts in International Maritime Centres

Chair: Kristy Kang
Assistant Professor, School of Art, Design and Media, Nanyang Technological University
Biography

Speaker: Stephen Davies
Founding Director of the Hong Kong Maritime Museum and Lecturer, University of Hong Kong
Biography & Abstract

 

Speaker: Harold Thwaites
Professor, Faculty of Arts, Sunway University, Malaysia
Biography & AbstractPresentation

 

Speaker: Venka Purushothaman
Vice-President (Academic) & Provost, LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore
Biography & Abstract Presentation

 

Q&A

 

Panel 5: Maritime Infrastructures, Research Facilities and Heritage Dynamics

Chair: Laura Longo
Associate Professor, School of Art, Design and Media, Nanyang Technological University
Biography

Speaker: Malcolm Tull
Professor, School of Management and Governance, Murdoch University in Australia and Chair of organising committee, International Congress of Maritime History (Seventh International Conference of Maritime History 2016)
Biography & AbstractPresentation

 

Speaker: Agamemnon Tselikas
Director, Centre of History and Palaeography of the National Bank of Greece Cultural Foundation
Adjunct Professor, University of Patras and University of Corfu’ (Greece)
Biography & Abstract │ Presentation

 

Speaker: Auron Tare
Director General, Albanian National Coastline Agency
Biography & Abstract │ Presentation

 

Speaker: Andrea Bonifacio
Deputy Director, Marco Polo System G.E.I.E. (Municipality of Venice)
Biography & Abstract │ Presentation 1 & 2

 

Q&A

 

Singapore Maritime Trails

 

Panel 6: Maritime Education: Inspiring the New Generations

Chair: Khong Shen Ping
Dean, Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore Academy
Biography

 

Speakers: Frederick Francis (Senior Lecturer, Singapore Maritime Academy, Singapore Polytechnic)
and Albert Teo (Vice-Commodore, Youth Skipper Flotilla Society)
Biography & AbstractPresentation

 

Closing remarks by Andrea Nanetti and Cheong Siew Ann
Conference chairs